Managing Bandwidth Across HTS Spot Beams

By Nikola Kromer, Senior Director Product Marketing, iDirect

Nikola-KromerIn his recent blog Denis Sutherland, iDirect’s Director of Business Development, points out the challenge facing Satellite Operators when it comes to having the right amount of satellite capacity available in the right place over the lifetime of the satellite. This is critical to the success of Satellite Operators launching High Throughput Satellites (HTS). And managing that bandwidth across multiple HTS spot beams comes with a set of additional considerations for both Satellite Operators as well as Service Providers. Why is that?

Managing HTS bandwidth across multiple spot beams, compared to a single wide-beam coverage is a challenge. It comes down to being able to maintain Service Level Agreements (SLAs) across the entire customer network by managing the network capacity on multiple spot beams as one single bandwidth pool.

Think also about the difference in operational economics that come with multiple spot beams. Service Providers who are only using a few MHz on each beam would need to equip multiple spot beams with ground infrastructure versus just a single wide beam. That’s why we see more Satellite Operators planning to pre-populate multiple spot beams with hubs and line cards to allow Service Providers to cost-effectively operate regional networks. It is for these reasons that we expect to see more Satellite Operators coming down from space to start offering managed services.

It will have a direct impact on the business models for how Satellite Operators will bring HTS to market. Check out this infographic that describes the HTS business models in more detail.

Thus far, the most common model we have seen play out with HTS is the Satellite Operator as the principle owner and operator of the platform, managing bandwidth on one or more satellites. Depending on the business model, the Satellite Operator sells a Mbps service to Service Providers or end-customers directly. Read More

SES And Cable MSO Armstrong Launch Ultra-HD Trial

From Via Satellite

SES announced it has initiated a live and linear Ultra-HD trial with cable Multiple System Operator (MSO) Armstrong. From its headquarters cable lab in Butler, Pa., Armstrong is testing SES’s camera-to-screen Ultra-HD ecosystem first unveiled in April 2015.

SES’ solution combines broadcast and IP technologies in a fully managed, scalable service. The solution combines satellite with the multicasting capabilities of Data Over Cable System Interface Specification (DOCSIS) 3.0, the advanced transmission standard in use by Armstrong and other leading cable systems today.

“The outcome of these tests will support progress toward our objective of accelerating the roll-out of linear-live Ultra-HD,” said Steve Corda, vice president of business development for SES in North America. Continue >

HTS Bandwidth Management: Can A Satellite Change Its Spots?

Denis SutherlandBy Denis Sutherland, Director of Business Development, iDirect

Having the right amount of satellite capacity available in the right place is critical to the success of Service Providers and Satellite Operators leveraging High Throughput Satellites (HTS).

As discussed in previous blogs, I expect to see Service Providers deploy a blended portfolio of different business models. That means they will use managed services in some geographical regions, but then also deploy their own infrastructure on other satellites. At the same time we will see satellite operators coming down from space, and offering Mbps service due to the economics of multi-spot beam HTS. Service Providers will leverage these products as well, with terminals roaming from their own network infrastructure onto the satellite operator networks based on the geographical locations the services require.

Managing Bandwidth Across Multiple Spot Beams

Maintaining Service Level Agreements (SLAs) across the entire customer network requires managing the combined bandwidth from the multiple spot beams dedicated to that service as one single bandwidth pool. In traditional wide-beam satellites, a regional network was often covered by a single beam. In a multi spot-beam environment, however, covering a similar region means managing bandwidth across multiple spot beams and networks.

Mobility

HTS planning issues become acute when you have mobile terminals. Imagine you want to cover a large geographic area, for example, North America; some HTS satellites need 50 spot beams to cover such an area. Now consider a service provider that offers an SLA to provide 1 Mbps to each terminal over this region; as terminals move around from beam-to-beam some spot beams could be empty, while others would have many terminals. Read More

RigNet Wins Remote Managed Offshore Communications Contract

From Via Satellite

RigNet has received a multi-year contract from a major operator of offshore drilling and production assets in Southeast Asia to deliver remote offshore communications services. The company will provide comprehensive managed remote communications solutions on the customer’s Mobile Offshore Production Unit (MOPU), including telephony, network support and onboard crew Wi-Fi.

RigNet plans to connect its client’s headquarters to its Singapore teleport through fiber optic backhaul. The customer will receive 24/7 network monitoring and support from RigNet’s global Network Operations Center (NOC), with in-country support services provided on their offshore site as required. RigNet offers fully managed end-to-end connectivity solutions using Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) technology. Continue >

Axesat Signs Intelsat EpicNG Deal For Enterprise Networks And Cellular Backhaul

From Via Satellite

Axesat, one of Colombia’s key providers of satellite-based corporate networks has reached a new multiyear agreement with Intelsat for services on the EpicNG High Throughput Satellite (HTS) Intelsat 29e. Under the agreement, Axesat will consolidate services spread across multiple satellites and operators, including Intelsat 805 and Intelsat 14, onto Intelsat 907 at 332.5 degrees east and Intelsat 29e at 310 degrees east. Axesat plans to use Intelsat satellite services to support the growing needs of its corporate enterprise customers as well as its cellular backhaul customers throughout Latin America.

Under construction by Boeing, Intelsat 29e is scheduled to launch in the first quarter of 2016 aboard an Ariane 5 rocket. The satellite is equipped with a combination of high-power Ku-band spot beams and wide beams, and has an open architecture design with backward compatibility.

Axesat intends to use Intelsat’s satellite services to boost efficiencies and grow its business into new geographic markets. The company entered the market of Mexico through the acquisition of then Satmex subsidiary Enlaces Integra in 2013, and has seen a steady growth in demand for cellular backhaul among other services. Continue >

iDirect Remote Commissioning Solution Helps Axesat Streamline VSAT Installations Across Latin America

VT iDirect, Inc. (iDirect), a company of  Vision Technologies Systems, Inc. (VT Systems), today announced that satellite service provider Axesat has implemented the iDirect Remote Commissioning Solution to help accelerate the commissioning of its VSAT remotes, enabling it to deploy new services more efficiently and add customers on to the network faster. Axesat’s VSAT service, based on iDirect Evolution, offers connectivity solutions to customers in retail, construction and infrastructure, financial and oil and gas markets across Latin America. iDirect is a world leader in satellite-based IP communications technology.

Axesat PR1

Members of the Axesat team align the satellite signal using the iDirect Remote Commissioning Solution from a laptop

Axesat is a multinational company with presence in Mexico, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela and Central America.The service provider is targeting Mexico as its base for serving the entire Latin American market. Roughly half of its 12,000 VSATs are installed in this region, where it anticipates new opportunities across such core markets as retail, infrastructure, financial and oil and gas growing the business by 40-50%.

The iDirect Remote Commissioning Solution is based on Integrasys’ Satmotion product and allows Axesat to autonomously point and adjust its antennas, streamlining the overall commissioning of its X1, X3 and X5 remotes. This helps support the anticipated growth for Axesat, allowing it to deploy new services quicker, and get customers up-and-running on the network at an accelerated pace. Read More

iDirect’s Evolution Platform Is Selected By Via Direta To Power Largest Distance-learning Program In Brazil

VT iDirect, Inc. (iDirect), a company of Vision Technologies Systems, Inc. (VT Systems), today announced that Via Direta Telecom, a subsidiary of TV and radio broadcast group Rede Tiradentes de Telecomunicações, has selected the iDirect Evolution® platform to enable the largest, most ambitious distance-learning program ever created in Brazil. iDirect is a world leader in satellite-based IP communications technology.

PR-1

Using iDirect technology, Via Direta will be able to deliver lessons from a teacher located in the city of Manaus to roughly 45,000 remote students situated along the rivers of the Amazon basin.

PR-2

Limited broadband coverage in Brazil has left roughly 97 million people without access to the Internet.1 Actively exploring a solution, the Amazon State’s Secretary of Education has commissioned Rede Tiradentes to create a distance-learning program that spans Brazil.

The program will use satellite to connect roughly 45,000 students situated across hundreds of municipalities along the rivers of the Amazon basin with teachers located in Manaus, the capital city of the state of Amazonas. Via Direta will operate the hub on behalf of Rede Tiradentes. Read More

Blend It Like Beckham

By Dave Davis, Sr. Systems Engineer, iDirect Europe

The recent IET MilSatcom conference was an excellent event, attended by most of the Dave Davisindustry’s key players. It was an outstanding opportunity to hear the perspectives of the UK MOD and several of the industry’s satellite providers, integrators, and partners, chaired by the charismatic Gerard Donelan. What is really good about the IET MilSatcom event is that there are very few sales pitches and plenty of insight, opinion and prediction, with the odd contentious point thrown in to make for good discussions in the breaks. And during those breaks, we had some great networking opportunities. All finished off with a final putting the world to rights session in the nearest local watering hole.

As usual at such conferences it didn’t take long for some common threads to become clear. These were increased data rates, a need for flexibility and the fact that one solution cannot fit all requirements.

It was generally accepted that data requirements are growing at an ever increasing rate. There has been an explosion of applications and devices which are either producing a massive throughput increase, such as ISTAR or a large amount of devices generating burst data, such as sensors…then add Autonomous vehicles, aircraft and maritime platforms…and mobile command platforms…and cell backhaul…and BYOD…and Big Data….

These data requirements are also very hard to predict going forward. It was generally accepted that increases in demand range from 10 to 30 percent annually. The soon to be released 12th edition of the NSR Global Satellite Capacity Supply and Demand report will make for interesting reading. Read More

iDirect Velocity® Capitalizes On Greater Performance, Scale And Reliability

By Nikola Kromer, Senior Director Product Marketing, iDirect

Nikola-KromerScale. As Denis Sutherland, iDirect’s Director of Business Development, addressed in his most recent blog, the advent of high throughput satellite (HTS) services is challenging the entire satellite ecosystem with regards to scale.

It is a thread that I’d like to discuss as we look at how the ground infrastructure is evolving to support new HTS architectures.

The Facts:

HTS delivers higher aggregate throughput for the same amount of allocated frequency in orbit. A significant reason for higher throughput is frequency reuse, which is the process of using the same spectrum across multiple sites within a network resulting in a need for the ground infrastructure to enable many more carriers across a wider MHz spectrum.

Hub equipment needs to manage an increasingly diverse and integrated network portfolio that comprises of multiple satellites, frequency bands and market applications. Plus with the larger transponder sizes with HTS it requires massive scaling on the hub and line card systems.

The use of gateway beams changes where infrastructure must be located and how it will be deployed and managed. With an HTS uplink design, an operator can no longer place hubs anywhere under a beam. Instead, the entire hub infrastructure is oftentimes concentrated in fewer gateway beams scaling the network a single satellite or network operator needs to manage to new heights.

HTS throughput levels can also lead to more remotes per network and a larger overall bandwidth pool to manage, which can ultimately drive business growth for satellite operators and increase the operational complexity exponentially.

iDirect-Velocity-Capabilities Read More

Honeywell, Inmarsat And iDirect Reach An Airborne Milestone

From Satnews

Paving the way for a new era of in-flight wireless connectivity similar to what is available at home or in the office, Honeywell Aerospace and Inmarsat have successfully completed the first phase of hardware and satellite network flight tests for GX Aviation broadband services.

Honeywell’s JetWave-branded hardware enables airplanes to connect to Inmarsat’s Global Xpress satellite constellation for GX Aviation global Ka-band in-flight Wi-Fi services. The tests, which included streaming YouTube videos and live radio, online conference calls, downloading files and more, were conducted in the U.K. in June 2015, validating GX Aviation’s ability to deliver high-speed Wi-Fi connectivity while over land and water. The tests demonstrated a successful connection between the JetWave hardware and Inmarsat’s first Global Xpress satellite, I-5 F1, which powers GX Aviation services for Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia. This follows the ground-based high-speed and performance tests completed in March 2015.

The satellite network for GX Aviation is already operational in the Indian Ocean region for government, maritime and enterprise customers using the first Global Xpress satellite. The successful launch of the second satellite in February 2015 means Inmarsat’s Ka-band network also covers the Americas and the Atlantic Ocean region, with the third satellite ready for launch. Continue >